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What are the so called in Guatemala “zompopos de Mayo”?
Blog Maya-Ethnozoology MayanToons

What are the so called in Guatemala “zompopos de Mayo”?

The well-known zompopo de mayo in Guatemala is an ant species that belongs to the leafcutter and fungi cultivator ant group in the Atta genus. In that sense, these are the ants that can be frequently seen forming rows and carrying leaf trimmings. The colonies of these ants are conformed by worker ants of different…

Discovering “El Zotz”: Bats and Mayan culture
Blog Maya-Ethnozoology Mayan Culture

Discovering “El Zotz”: Bats and Mayan culture

In February of this year, we had the opportunity to visit the Biotopo Protegido San Miguel La Palotada El Zotz as part of our ongoing Biodiversity Documentation project in La Reserva de la Biósfera Maya. The Biotope is located in the municipality of San José, Petén, 584 km from Guatemala City and 65 km from…

Migratory birds: A special dynamic in the world
Blog Maya-Ethnozoology

Migratory birds: A special dynamic in the world

On October 12, World Migratory Bird Day was commemorated. This is a very important annual campaign to promote global awareness and conservation of migratory birds and their habitats. Migratory birds play an important role in the ecological dynamics of the sites they visit, as they are important predators of insects and vertebrates, dispersers of seeds,…

Praying Mantis in Chocon Machas River, Livingston
Livingston, Izabal Maya-Ethnozoology News

Praying Mantis in Chocon Machas River, Livingston

While the team of photographers took pictures of a yellow flower on the shore of Chocón Machacas River, I noticed that something yellow was moving on a plant next to us. It was a yellow mantis moving from one leaf to another. Photographers were interested in this insect because we have rarely seen it. Here…

Aquatic birds in Livingston: Janaca (Jacana spinosa)
Livingston, Izabal Maya-Ethnozoology News

Aquatic birds in Livingston: Janaca (Jacana spinosa)

In El Golfete, Livingston you can find an aquatic garden, also known as a botanic garden, a magical place where you can find many water lilies, Nymphoides indica and Nymphea ampla. It is a very photogenic place! While we were taking pictures of the water lilies we saw a Jacana (Jacana spinose) that in the…

Gray lined Hawk (Buteo nitidus) a raptor bird seen at Lampara River
Livingston, Izabal Maya-Ethnozoology News

Gray lined Hawk (Buteo nitidus) a raptor bird seen at Lampara River

In a tall Cahue tree that was in Lampara River in El Golfete, Livingston, Izabal, during the September expedition we saw a gray lined hawk. It is the first time we have photographed it during the Livingston Biodiversity Project. It was calm and allowed itself to be photographed very well. Buteo nitidus is an extremely…

Cicadas: The singers of the forest
Blog Flora and fauna research Maya-Ethnozoology Project Yaxha

Cicadas: The singers of the forest

It is very likely that during a walk through the forest you have heard the sound of thousands of cycads singing. Although they are rarely observed because they are mainly found in the treetops (or because some manage to camouflage themselves very well with the color of the barks from the trees) we can hear…

Celebrate the biggest feline of America
Blog FLAAR Mesoamerica Flora and fauna research Maya-Ethnozoology

Celebrate the biggest feline of America

The Jaguar (Panthera onca) is one of the most frequently encountered images in Mesoamerican art and iconography, in either naturalistic, stylized, or anthropomorphic form. Art is one of the ways in which people represent how they conceive of themselves, and their place in the world The appearance and frequency of jaguar motifs, as with any…

World Animal Day: Threatened Animals in Central America
Blog FLAAR Mesoamerica Maya-Ethnozoology

World Animal Day: Threatened Animals in Central America

The Census of Marine Life scientists estimated the total number of species on Earth (the most precise calculation ever offered), announcing 6.5 million species found on land and 2.2 million (about 25 percent of the total) dwelling in the ocean depths, that means about 8.7 million. Can you imagine how many exotic animals you don’t…